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A Life-Changing Tip for Smoothing Transitions so You can Actually Put the Groceries Away

We are thrilled to welcome Dayna Abraham to the blog!  Dayna is a long-time friend of Positive Parenting Solutions.  She offers helpful and practical advice for kids who have sensory processing differences and intense emotions. In celebration of her new book, we’ve asked Dayna to share her best tips to help kids through tough transitions. Enjoy!

It happens every time. We’ve been out with the family on a nice outing and on the way home I decide to stop by the grocery store for a few things for dinner. Everything seems to go perfectly well until we get home and then magically, my son, my sweet loving, hugging son, suddenly turns into this massive ball of frustration.

He needs me for everything.

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Six Summer Sanity Strategies for Parents

This is it. That time of year when it hits you – summer’s in full swing and there’s no school reprieve. Let the “what do we do NOW” chants begin.

There is hope, however, for getting through the “dog days” of summer without losing your marbles, your patience or your temper. Let’s take a look at some fun strategies to help you keep your cool and make some terrific memories with your kids this season.

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3 Questions Your Child Wants Dad to Answer

(And How You Can Help Him Answer Them)

We are thrilled to welcome pediatrician and best-selling author, Dr. Meg Meeker, to share her wisdom about the important role fathers play in a child’s life.

When I was 8 years old, my father took me to work with him on Saturday mornings to Mass General Hospital in Boston. I would sit at his gigantic desk, spin in his chair and when he finished, we would walk to a pastry shop and have a snack. He ordered coffee and I drank hot chocolate. As I look back, it feels like my father took me every Saturday, but truth be told, he probably only took me four or five times. But on those Saturday mornings, I felt important and loved.

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6 Tips for Raising Independent Children

As parents, it feels good—great even —when our kids NEED us. When they turn to us for guidance, affection, even that peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Those are all good things.

We do have to remind ourselves, however, our long-term parenting goal is to guide our kids from being totally dependent on us to being independent thinkers and doers. That’s no overnight task.

It happens in all the little moments and lessons that occur in the day-to-day. From little steps like letting them pick out their own clothes to tying their own shoes, to helping them learn to weigh out what to spend their allowance on to choosing a college that suits them. Every little decision they make, right or wrong, along the way is a learning experience that will help lead them to be independent people we can be proud of.

Then, the thrill you get when you see them take on a task all by themselves and win at it? That’s awesome! If you’re eager to see more of that, let’s look at six terrific tips for helping your kids embrace independence.

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The Parents’ Guide to the X-Plan: How to Hold Up Your End of the Bargain

You may have seen a recent post by a dad, Bert Fulks entitled X-Plan: Giving Your Kids a Way Out.  The article recently went viral, and for good reason. In it, Bert shared a powerful strategy that helped his children safely remove themselves from situations that were dangerous or uncomfortable. With a bonus – they could still save face with their friends.

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How I Changed from a Toxic Mom-Manager to an Encouraging Soul Builder

From New York Times bestselling author, Rachel Macy Stafford

There was a time in my life when I barked orders more often than I spoke words of love … when I reacted to small everyday inconveniences as if they were major catastrophes … when normal human habits and quirks raised my blood pressure to dangerous levels.

Rather than nurturing my family members, I took it upon myself to manage my family members until there was no room to bend or breathe.

My artistic, busybody, dream-chasing older daughter’s desire to start projects, try new recipes, and leave trails wherever she went received disapproving looks on a daily basis. 

My stop-and-smell-the-roses younger daughter’s desire to buckle in stuffed animals before we drove off, accessorize every part of her body before walking out the door, and move at a snail’s pace drew exasperated breaths and annoyed frowns.

My fun-loving, laidback husband’s spontaneous approach to weekend plans and ability to totally chill out got the silent treatment more times that I could count.

The people I was supposed to love unconditionally possessed qualities that irritated, annoyed, and continually derailed my carefully planned agenda—an agenda that was all about efficiency, perfection, and control.

I was not acting as a mother or a wife or even a decent human being. I was acting as a surly manager who was intent on creating a toxic environment—a place where it was pretty hard to show up each and every day.

How do I know?

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