parenting

Simple Words to Avoid Power Struggles

avoid power strugglesDid you know the average child hears 432 negative comments or words per day versus 32 positive ones? (Source: K. Kvols, Redirecting Children’s Behavior)

If there were a hidden camera in your house, how many times per day would you catch yourself saying “No” or “Don’t” to your kids?

NO or DON’T commands create several problems, especially for young kids… Read More

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How as little as 20 minutes a day can change your whole year!

Quality-time tips for toddlers to teens

mother daughter quality time

It’s not the next fad diet. It’s not a promise to yourself to stop running to Starbucks twice a day. It’s Mind, Body, & Soul Time, and it’s a New Year’s resolution for your whole family.

Mind, Body, & Soul Time is time spent one-on-one with each of your children, consistently and individually with each parent, on an activity they choose. Not only will it give you a better bond with your kids, but the attention and power boosts will fuel better behavior.

Whether Mind, Body, & Soul Time is new to your family, or you’ve tried it before and let it slide after work and school got hectic, start fresh and make it a simple part of your routine. Aim for ten minutes, twice a day with each child to keep their attention baskets filled regularly—but any amount will help. Turn off the technology, and let your child call the shots:
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Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew

Ten-Things-Revised_3D-low-res-217x300 This week we welcome Ellen Notbohm to the blog! Ellen is the author of the book, Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew. We chose a question asked by our Facebook community for Ellen to answer in her special guest post. Ellen’s advice is always helpful for parents of children with autism as well parents of typically developing children.

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The Three Best Parenting Resolutions For The New Year

What’s on your list of New Year’s resolutions this year? Exercise more? Eat better? Read more?

These are all great resolutions—which is why many of us list them year after year, and abandon them within weeks.

Instead, why not limit your New Year’s resolutions to actions that can have a dramatic impact on your family life? When you put your effort into meaningful goals that will benefit your household, you can have a profound effect on family relationships, organization and teamwork in the year ahead.

Following are the top three ways you can make a huge difference in your kids’ behavior and your family dynamics. You’ll see success right away, which means you’re more likely to stick with them throughout the year (and beyond).
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Sibling Harmony

Peace and Joy: 5 Tips for Sibling Harmony


Let’s face it – sibling spats are a part of life. 

In fact, sibling rivalry is not only inevitable, it’s a healthy way for kids to learn how to compromise and navigate relationships.

But on the downside, the constant bickering can also wreak havoc on daily life, not to mention Mom’s and Dad’s nerves.

Our goal is to achieve at least some measure of sibling harmony, right?

I know that may sound like an impossible dream, but it’s absolutely do-able with these five Sibling Harmony tips:
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Naughty or Nice?

Getting good holiday behavior from your kids.

better holiday behavior

First stop: your tween’s dance rehearsal. Then, a visit to a local charity. Next, it’s last-minute shopping for gifts, making cookies for your eight year-old’s class party, and then a holiday dinner – and that’s just your Saturday!

A day like that can often drive even the merriest of people to make a less-than-polite grab for the store’s last set of lights or play chicken over that coveted front-row parking space. When kids get thrown into that mix of traveling, visits from relatives, and holiday events – all on top of their normal school work and activities- it’s a winter miracle that they have the energy left to behave at all!

The fact is that kids wear out faster than adults, and that tired or mentally over-stimulated children are the ones most likely to act out or throw fits. Read More

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