Press
Blog

Parenting Blog

This Earth Day, Ditch the Green Guilt and Enjoy Big Savings

big green purse

Are you one of those parents who suffers from green guilt? You’re not alone. A new survey by Today.com and iVillage found that 94 percent of moms think they could – and should — do more to help the environment. But almost half of moms think “going green” is too expensive, while twenty percent say either they don’t have enough time or that it’s just too inconvenient.

Happily, you can easily have a more earth-friendly lifestyle that’s convenient and will save you a lot of money. Plus the changes are so easy, the whole family can follow suit. How? Shift to affordable and easily-available eco products that you can find in any supermarket or hardware store. Here are five that you can switch to in time for Earth Day, April 22.

  1. Reusable sponge. A sponge lasts 17 times as long as throwaway paper towels and will save you $30 or more over the lifetime of the sponge. Buy a few sponges in different sizes – small for wiping off dishes before you load them in the dishwasher, larger for wiping up spills. Extend the life of the sponge by running it through the dishwasher, then zap the clean, damp sponge for 30 seconds in the microwave or set it outside in the bright sun to dry out.
  2. Reusable water bottle (notice a trend in “reusables” here?). Ounce for ounce you could be paying as much as 10,000 times more for bottled water than tap. Why? Because in addition to the water , you’re paying for the bottle, the bottle cap, the bottle label, the energy used to make and transport the bottles, and water that’s wasted during the bottling process. For less than $20, you can buy a reusable water bottle and enjoy tap water whenever you need it. You’ll have money left over to buy a filter for your tap if you want, or to buy a bottle that comes with its own changeable filter.
  3. Lunch box. People waste hundreds of dollars a year buying carry-out at lunch time. The food may be delicious, but all the wrapping needed to package it up is expensive – and a real waste of resources. For less than $10 or $15, buy a reusable lunch box or bag, and take food from home in reusable containers. You’ll save hundreds of dollars and create a lot less trash, too.
  4. Energy-efficient light bulb. Compact fluorescent light bulbs use 66% less energy than a regular incandescent and last ten times as long, saving time as well as money. You may not have liked the original CFLs because the light was a bit harsh. Today, you can get CFLs in many hues, for indoor as well as outdoor application. Just one CFL can save you $5 – $10 a year in energy costs, $100 over the life of the bulb.
  5. Reusable shopping bag. Nothing could be cheaper to buy or more convenient to use than a reusable grocery bag. Most supermarkets sell them for as little as ninety-nine cents. Buy five at once, and you’ll have as many as you need for your weekly shopping. Can’t remember to take them with you to the store? Whenever I unpack my groceries, I put my bags together right next to my car keys. The next time I get in my car, I take the bags with me and put them in the trunk. I’m almost never without my shopping bags.

You can find more money-saving green living tips at www.biggreenpurse.com. Don’t miss our helpful Earth Day tips here. Sign up for our free Green Purse Alerts! and receive a free copy of 13 Nagging Environmental Questions Finally Answered.
Happy Earth Day!

Diane MacEachernDiane MacEachern is the founder of www.biggreenpurse.com and the author of Big Green Purse: Use Your Spending Power to Create a Cleaner, Greener World.

Talking to Kids About Touch Does NOT Have to Be Scary

Irene van der Zande, Kidpower.org Founder and “Doing Right by Our Kids” Co-Creator

kids laying on a hill

April is Child Abuse Awareness and Prevention Month – and as adults, we need to face the realities of child abuse in order to be able to protect our kids.

But, the good news is that we do not need to pass our fears onto our children to keep them safe! In over two decades of teaching child protection and empowerment at Kidpower, we have found that talking to kids about how to be safe with touch, play, and teasing can be done in a way that is fun, rather than scary.

In order to protect themselves from sexual abuse, kids don’t need to know all the scary details of what could happen. They just need to learn what the safety rules are, how to set and respect boundaries with people they know, and how to be persistent in getting help from busy adults.

If kids learn how to stop one kind of unwanted or unsafe touch, they will develop the skills to be able to stop another. Also, most child molesters often “test” a young person’s boundaries using non-sexual touch at first, and are clever about choosing kids who won’t tell.

Kids are more likely to remember what they’ve practiced than what they’ve only been told. To give kids practice in a fun, emotionally safe way, parents can use age-appropriate situations using non-sexual examples.

  • With young children, you can practice stopping a puppet from tickling them.
  • With a child in sports, you can practice how to stop unwanted roughhousing when it gets too wild.
  • With a child who has music or swimming lessons, you can practice how to tell someone, “It helped before when you held my hands to help me do this, but now I would rather that you just show me what to do instead of holding onto me.”
  • With a teenager, you can practice how to tell someone you like as a friend that you don’t want to hold hands.

To help parents out, my collaborator Dr. Amy Tiemann and I are presenting a free “Talking about Touch and Boundaries” Starter Kit from http://www.DoingRightByOurKids.com. This kit presents Kidpower language with illustrations as an easy tool to explain the core principles and safety rules to kids in ways that are fun, not scary.

We hope you will join Dr. Amy Tiemann and myself, with Amy McCready as a parenting expert co-host, for an on-line chat about child safety at TheMotherhood.com.

Our “Keeping Kids Safe” talk http://www.themotherhood.com/talk/show/id/Keeping-Our-Kids-Safe will take place on April 17th at 1 P.M. Eastern Time. You can ask us your questions about child safety, and how to talk about it with your kids, in this live question and answer discussion. We hope you’ll join us!

A Birthday Party For Twins: Shared Or Separate?

twinpartyWhen our twins were born, I quickly realized that the more I did with my babies as a set, the more validation I got as a mom. The average person would look on as I tandem breastfed and would marvel at my accomplishment. Merely navigating the aisles of the supermarket with one baby in the cart and the other in a sling was enough to garner looks of approval and a brief adult conversation or two. All this was so needed early on that I actually feared taking out only one baby and no longer being “special”. On top of all of this, there was so much of an accepted mystique about twins and how they should always be together, that they would miss each other and so forth.

Over time I realized that this widely held belief that twins prefer to be together was actually getting in the way of many things. As my children have gotten older, I have really come to understand that although it is a unique and wonderful thing to be a twin, it is perhaps even more wonderful to be known for one’s own individual self. One of my favorite quotes is from the book Siblings Without Rivalry: “To be loved equally is somehow to be loved less. To be loved uniquely – for one’s own special self – is to be loved as much as we need to be loved”.

Over the years I have done a lot to help my children feel that they are known for their own individual selves, not just as part of a set. Although we do a lot as a family, we also spend a great deal of one on one time with each of them, they have play dates without the other, they have separate rooms, they will be in separate classes when they start Kindergarten next year, we encourage separate after school activities and so forth. This does nothing to diminish their bond as siblings or twins; in fact, I believe it strengthens it immensely.

Of all of the things we do to nurture their individuality and encourage their sense of self, what has most recently seemed to make the greatest impact on them was having separate birthday parties for their 5th birthday.

We always had two birthday cakes and sang “Happy Birthday” to them separately, but this year I offered them the opportunity to have a party of their own and they jumped at it. Over the next couple of months the excitement built, they told everyone about their respective parties, what the theme was going to be and who was coming. Most of all, they told everyone that they were having their own party, just for them. I began to realize that it was a different sense of excitement than in previous years, this time it was a chance for each of them to bask in the glow of their special day when everyone is there for them, without having to share that experience with another person.

Most of you who have a sibling know the feeling of having to share toys or clothes or maybe a room. But few siblings of different ages have to share a birthday. It is just obvious to most parents that each child would get his or her own birthday party. Yet the reaction from many people was one of surprise when I said I was doing this for my children.

Although throwing two birthday parties in one weekend was more work (and a greater expense) for us, seeing the joy our children had being able to experience their special day just for themselves was well worth it. On top of this, the experience also allowed us to teach them lessons about being gracious when it was not their day, being aware of their own feelings as well as the feelings of their sibling, exercising patience and most importantly, having the awareness that they were each being honored for who they are, as individuals.

Gina Osher

Gina Osher is a former holistic healer turned parenting coach and mother of boy/girl twins. She is also the author of the blog, The Twin Coach in which she offers advice, bares her soul, works though her imperfect parenting moments and continues on her journey to be a more joyful parent. Gina is dedicated to helping others find both a deeper understanding of themselves and a stronger connection to the children they love.

How To Handle Kids Who Won’t Do Their Homework or Chores

chores1Empathizing versus lecturing can go a long way in diffusing power struggles and it reinforces that you’re on the same team. This week, if your kids start complaining about doing their homework or chores, instead of lecturing, just say this simple phrase.

Watch the video below to learn this simple phrase that will deflect the power struggle.

Read More

Taking the Terror Out of Teen Dating

teendating1Let’s be honest: the idea of your little darling off on a date might be the scariest thing since potty training. The natural instinct for many parents is to clamp down; but while placing your teen under house arrest may keep the dates at bay for now, it doesn’t do much good in the long run.

Rather than reacting in fear to this new part of your young adult’s life, lead with love. Make it clear you are on the same team as your teen: your job is to give them the structure to help them make the sophisticated decisions that come with dating.

By talking openly with your teen, you can implement dating rules that fit into your existing parent-child dynamic. Although it may require having difficult conversations, working with your child to establish these boundaries will take stress off of each of you and help clearly maintain high expectations for your teen’s behavior.

Below are some dating rules that we might want to set, and some ways we can tweak them to keep our teens both safe and happy. Do any of these sound familiar?

Read More

Dad Shoots Laptop in Video Rant – Parenting Hero?

You’ve probably already seen the video of the Dad who posted a YouTube video rant to his daughter in response to her recent Facebook tirade. In her Facebook post, the daughter spews her disgust for being required to do so many family chores, to the point where, “I have no idea how I have a life.” Dad’s emotional YouTube rant ends with him shooting bullet holes through her laptop. As I watched the video, my heart broke for the whole family.

Read More
Page 20 of 38« First...10...1819202122...30...Last »
Press